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Dr Sanjay Gupta Pede Desculpas À População Por Ajudar Na Gguerra Contra Maconha.


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  • Usuário Growroom

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/bestoftv/2013/08/08/dr-sanjay-gupta-marijuana.cnn.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Tqg2y3yYR0&feature=youtu.be

(CNN) -- Over the last year, I have been working on a
new documentary called "Weed." The title "Weed" may sound cavalier, but
the content is not.


I traveled around the
world to interview medical leaders, experts, growers and patients. I
spoke candidly to them, asking tough questions. What I found was
stunning.


Long before I began this
project, I had steadily reviewed the scientific literature on medical
marijuana from the United States and thought it was fairly unimpressive.
Reading these papers five years ago, it was hard to make a case for
medicinal marijuana. I even wrote about this in a TIME magazine article,
back in 2009, titled "Why I would Vote No on Pot."


Well, I am here to
apologize.


I apologize because I
didn't look hard enough, until now. I didn't look far enough. I didn't
review papers from smaller labs in other countries doing some remarkable
research, and I was too dismissive of the loud chorus of legitimate
patients whose symptoms improved on cannabis.


Instead, I lumped them
with the high-visibility malingerers, just looking to get high. I
mistakenly believed the Drug Enforcement Agency listed marijuana as a schedule
1 substance
because of sound scientific proof. Surely, they must
have quality reasoning as to why marijuana is in the category of the
most dangerous drugs that have "no accepted medicinal use and a high
potential for abuse."




110914125138-sanjay-gupta-story-body.jpg

Dr. Sanjay Gupta is a neurosurgeon and CNN's chief medical
correspondent.

They didn't have the
science to support that claim, and I now know that when it comes to
marijuana neither of those things are true. It doesn't have a high
potential for abuse, and there are very legitimate medical applications.
In fact, sometimes marijuana is the only thing that works. Take the
case of Charlotte
Figi
, who I met in Colorado. She started having seizures soon after
birth. By age 3, she was having 300 a week, despite being on seven
different medications. Medical marijuana has calmed her brain, limiting
her seizures to 2 or 3 per month.


I have seen more patients
like Charlotte first hand, spent time with them and come to the
realization that it is irresponsible not to provide the best care we can
as a medical community, care that could involve marijuana.


We have been terribly and
systematically misled for nearly 70 years in the United States, and I
apologize for my own role in that.

I hope this article and
upcoming documentary will help set the record straight.


On August 14, 1970, the
Assistant Secretary of Health, Dr. Roger O. Egeberg wrote a letter
recommending the plant, marijuana, be classified as a schedule 1
substance, and it has remained that way for nearly 45 years. My research
started with a careful reading of that decades old letter. What I found
was unsettling. Egeberg had carefully chosen his words:


"Since there is still a
considerable void in our knowledge of the plant and effects of the
active drug contained in it, our recommendation is that marijuana be
retained within schedule 1 at least until the completion of certain
studies now underway to resolve the issue."


Not because of sound
science, but because of its absence, marijuana was classified as a
schedule 1 substance. Again, the year was 1970. Egeberg mentions studies
that are underway, but many were never completed. As my investigation
continued, however, I realized Egeberg did in fact have important
research already available to him, some of it from more than 25 years
earlier.


High risk of abuse


In 1944, New York Mayor
Fiorello LaGuardia commissioned research to be performed by the New
York Academy of Science. Among their conclusions: they found marijuana
did not lead to significant addiction in the medical sense of the word.
They also did not find any evidence marijuana led to morphine, heroin or
cocaine addiction.


We now know that while
estimates vary, marijuana leads to dependence in around 9 to 10% of its
adult users. By comparison, cocaine, a
schedule 2 substance
"with less abuse potential than schedule 2
drugs" hooks 20% of those who use it. Around 25% of heroin users become
addicted.


The worst is tobacco,
where the number is closer to 30% of smokers, many of whom go on to die
because of their addiction.


There is clear evidence
that in some people marijuana use can lead to withdrawal symptoms,
including insomnia, anxiety and nausea. Even considering this, it is
hard to make a case that it has a high potential for abuse. The physical
symptoms of marijuana addiction are nothing like those of the other
drugs I've mentioned. I have seen the withdrawal from alcohol, and it
can be life threatening.


I do want to mention a
concern that I think about as a father. Young, developing brains are
likely more susceptible to harm from marijuana than adult brains. Some
recent studies suggest that regular use in teenage years leads to a
permanent decrease in IQ. Other research hints at a possible heightened
risk of developing psychosis.


Much in the same way I
wouldn't let my own children drink alcohol, I wouldn't permit marijuana
until they are adults. If they are adamant about trying marijuana, I
will urge them to wait until they're in their mid-20s when their brains
are fully developed.


Medical benefit


While investigating, I
realized something else quite important. Medical marijuana is not new,
and the medical community has been writing about it for a long time.
There were in fact hundreds of journal articles, mostly documenting the
benefits. Most of those papers, however, were written between the years
1840 and 1930. The papers described the use of medical marijuana to
treat "neuralgia, convulsive disorders, emaciation," among other things.


A search through the
U.S. National Library of Medicine this past year pulled up nearly 20,000 more recent papers. But the majority were
research into the harm of marijuana, such as "Bad
trip due to anticholinergic effect of cannabis
," or "Cannabis
induced pancreatitits
" and "Marijuana
use and risk of lung cancer
."


In my quick running of
the numbers, I calculated about 6% of the current U.S. marijuana studies
investigate the benefits of medical marijuana. The rest are designed to
investigate harm. That imbalance paints a highly distorted picture.


The challenges
of marijuana
research


To do studies on
marijuana in the United States today, you need two important things.


First of all, you need
marijuana. And marijuana is illegal. You see the problem. Scientists can
get research marijuana from a special farm in Mississippi, which is
astonishingly located in the middle of the Ole Miss campus, but it is
challenging. When I visited this year, there was no marijuana being
grown.


The second thing you
need is approval, and the scientists I interviewed kept reminding me how
tedious that can be. While a cancer study may first be evaluated by the
National Cancer Institute, or a pain study may go through the National
Institute for Neurological Disorders, there is one more approval
required for marijuana: NIDA, the National Institute on Drug Abuse. It
is an organization that has a core mission of studying drug abuse, as
opposed to benefit.


Stuck in the middle are
the legitimate patients who depend on marijuana as a medicine,
oftentimes as their only good option.


Keep in mind that up
until 1943, marijuana was part of the United States drug pharmacopeia.
One of the conditions for which it was prescribed was neuropathic pain. It is a miserable pain that's
tough to treat. My own patients have described it as "lancinating,
burning and a barrage of pins and needles." While marijuana has long
been documented to be effective for this awful pain, the most common
medications prescribed today come from the poppy plant, including
morphine, oxycodone and dilaudid.


Here is the problem.
Most of these medications don't work very well for this kind of pain,
and tolerance is a real problem.


Most frightening to me
is that someone dies in the United States every
19 minutes from a prescription drug overdose
, mostly accidental.
Every 19 minutes. It is a horrifying statistic. As much as I searched, I
could not find a documented case of death from marijuana overdose.


It is perhaps no
surprise then that 76% of physicians recently surveyed said they would approve the use of
marijuana to help ease a woman's pain from breast cancer.


When marijuana became a
schedule 1 substance, there was a request to fill a "void in our
knowledge." In the United States, that has been challenging because of
the infrastructure surrounding the study of an illegal substance, with a
drug abuse organization at the heart of the approval process. And yet,
despite the hurdles, we have made considerable progress that continues
today.


Looking forward, I am
especially intrigued by studies like those in Spain and Israel looking
at the anti-cancer effects of marijuana and its components.
I'm intrigued by the neuro-protective study by Lev Meschoulam in
Israel, and research in Israel and the United States on whether the drug
might help alleviate symptoms of PTSD. I promise to do my part
to help, genuinely and honestly, fill the remaining void in our
knowledge.


Citizens in 20 states
and the District of Columbia have now voted to approve marijuana for
medical applications, and more states will be making that choice soon.
As for Dr. Roger Egeberg, who wrote that letter in 1970, he passed away
16 years ago.


I wonder what he would
think if he were alive today.

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  • Usuário Growroom

"I apologize because I
didn't look hard enough, until now. I didn't look far enough. I didn't
review papers from smaller labs in other countries doing some remarkable
research, and I was too dismissive of the loud chorus of legitimate
patients whose symptoms improved on cannabis."

Ele devia ter colocado, "E eu tambem nunca tinha dado um tapinha sequer, hoje minha opiniao é diferente, desculpas"

E vai acontecer com muitos outros, veremos o mundo pedir desculpas, mas mesmo la, muitos ainda estarao chorando a morte de familiares....

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Que bom que houve o reconhecimento, e espero que outros tomem essa atitude nobre, entretanto, a postura, o comportamento humano está doente, em crise, ainda veremos muitos casos assim porém acredito que uma bala deferida não há como voltar atrás, ou seja, vamos ter mais responsabilidade com o saber mais que com a "ciência estabelecida" pois assemelha-se muito com aquele pedido de desculpas vazio.

Aquela força combatentes

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É incrível o lobby midiatico em cima da neuroscience... Eles querem colocar o cérebro no centro da sociedade a todo custo, fazendo o proselitismo de sua agenda individualista ultra-neo-reaço-liberal... É CNN, Fox News, Rede Troxa, Super Interessante e etc...

O cérebro é importante sim mas nao é dono da sociedade... Aqui farropalheta!

Pronto falei polemica... Kkkk

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É incrível o lobby midiatico em cima da neuroscience... Eles querem colocar o cérebro no centro da sociedade a todo custo, fazendo o proselitismo de sua agenda individualista ultra-neo-reaço-liberal... É CNN, Fox News, Rede Troxa, Super Interessante e etc...

O cérebro é importante sim mas nao é dono da sociedade... Aqui farropalheta!

Pronto falei polemica... Kkkk

Assim como a Cannabis o Cerebro é quase um mito, ninguém compreende muito bem até hj, só algumas regioes e olhe lá...

Essa é a parte mais importante do depoimento pra mim: What I found was stunning. Welcome to new world dude!

Seus HIPOCRITAS!!!

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  • Usuário Growroom

É incrível o lobby midiatico em cima da neuroscience... Eles querem colocar o cérebro no centro da sociedade a todo custo, fazendo o proselitismo de sua agenda individualista ultra-neo-reaço-liberal... É CNN, Fox News, Rede Troxa, Super Interessante e etc...

O cérebro é importante sim mas nao é dono da sociedade... Aqui farropalheta!

Pronto falei polemica... Kkkk

Tem uma teoria aí segundo a qual os intestinos também "raciocinam" em um nível muito básico. Pesquisa aí: gut brain!

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  • Usuário Growroom

x2

Eh só uma questão de tempo. Pena q no Brasil vamos esperar muito.

É só lembrar da velocidade de qualquer órgão público, dos processos, da máquina burocrática brasileira...

"...é uma questão de tempo..."

- É sim. Agora, quanto tempo? Não é pessimismo. É que eu também sou brasileiro, sei como as coisas tendem a (não) funcionar aqui. Parece que no Brasil, ainda não aprenderam a RESOLVER PRIMEIRO AS COISAS PRIMEIRAS.

Espero morder língua!

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Galera!

Acho que temos que fazer um esforço para traduzirmos esse documentário importantissimo!

Alguem tem a manha de fazer isso?

O documentário que o usuario Acid Raindrop colocou?

Meu inglês não é muito bom, mas, eu ajudo na tradução, se 5 pessoas ajudarem, cada uma fica com 10min pra traduzir, eu tenho uma pequena experiencia com legenda, posso ajudar na sincronização, mas sozinho eu não faço nada. Se mais alguem se disponibilizar!! Estamos ai! Já baixei do youtube por garantia.

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Seria legal se conseguissemos dividir isso entre algumas pessoas para ver se vai mais rápido e depois da legenda montada fica mais fácil de mandarmos para alguem revisar.

QUem mais poderia ajudar???

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  • Consultores Jurídicos GR

Essa doc de 40 minutos da menina tinha que ser visto por todo mundo. Me emocionei vendo. É um absurdo imaginar que ainda existem pessoas que não acreditam. Tinha que colocar legendas mesmo. Vi com as do YT em português, mas para o grande público ver é ruim.

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  • Usuário Growroom

Se não me engano ela está quase curada né? poucas convulsões em semanas... mais será que não está fazendo falta o THC?

A demonização do THC, e a recomendação de um óleo que seja rico somente em CBD,

atrapalha o processo de cura em casos de problemas neurológicos, inclusive no caso dela.

Sei que é ele que tem propriedades anti-convulsivas e tals, mais o THC exerce papel importante tb na regeneração do cérebro,

não é a toa que está cheio de receptores CB1 nele.

Existe o fato tb de que o THC e o CBD juntos ocorre a sinergia, li isso por ai...

Um óleo meio a meio nesses cannabinóides, o CBD certamente já irá anular a euforia do THC, pra min tem que ter os 2...

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  • Usuário Growroom

Se não me engano ela está quase curada né? poucas convulsões em semanas... mais será que não está fazendo falta o THC?

A demonização do THC, e a recomendação de um óleo que seja rico somente em CBD,

atrapalha o processo de cura em casos de problemas neurológicos, inclusive no caso dela.

Sei que é ele que tem propriedades anti-convulsivas e tals, mais o THC exerce papel importante tb na regeneração do cérebro,

não é a toa que está cheio de receptores CB1 nele.

Existe o fato tb de que o THC e o CBD juntos ocorre a sinergia, li isso por ai...

Um óleo meio a meio nesses cannabinóides, o CBD certamente já irá anular a euforia do THC, pra min tem que ter os 2...

Caro 710man,

Na minha humilde opinião ...

Ninguém sabe exatamente como funciona todos os quase de 100 canabinoides de Erva, isso sem falar dos incontáveis outros elementos. Mas quanto ao CBD, este parece realmente mais interessante para controle de convulsões, espasmos, e distonias.

Talvez seja pelo fato dele atuar tanto na periferia (SNP, placa motora, e músculos ) quanto no SNC.

Por enquanto, o melhor modelo é tentativa e erro. Então a máxima "Find your strain", ainda ta valendo.

Se pararmos para pensar, o tratamento com alopatia continua sendo assim até hj. Existem vários remédios para os mesmos problemas neurológicos. Alguns pacientes se dão bem um uns, alguns com outros, e não raramente vemos pacientes que não melhoram com nada do arsenal terapêutico.

Uma outra questão relevante especificamente no caso da menininha, é que existem fortes suspeitas que o THC pode realmente ser prejudicial para o cérebro imaturo. Assim, é muito mais prudente tentar inicialmente usar um Strain rico em CBD e com o menor percentual possível de THC.

Uma coisa é certa... Quanto mais pessoas conseguirem alívio do seus problemas com a cannabis, mais poderemos entender como ela realmente funciona.

Abs

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  • Usuário Growroom

"nos ultimos 40 anos a média de thc na maconha subiu de 1% pra 13%, muito perigoso"

sentar na minha rola nao querem? argumento falho demais, porra!!!

ha 2000 anos jesus e o povo tomavam vinho, media de 10% de alcool, agora já existe tequilas e outros com 90% de alcool, e aí? toma quem quer!!

tomar no rabo eles num querem! rs

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